FORT WAYNE, Ind. (Fort Wayne's NBC) --- A Fort Wayne teen is in trouble with the law, after a gun fired, badly hurting two other kids.  

More on what is being called an accidental shooting, along with an urgent warning to parents.

In the 2700 block of Chestnut Street Sunday morning, a 14-year old boy was shot in the head, a 9-year old took a bullet in the leg, and another 14-year old  was blamed for the tragic outcome, all because a firearm discharged when it wasn't supposed to.

The suspect is facing a count of criminal recklessness.

We're not naming him, because he has not been charged as an adult.

Police say the young people had gathered at 9-year old Christopher Hatch's grandmother's house, before heading off to church.

We're told the teen charged brought the loaded handgun to the home and the boys were "inspecting it", when it went off, striking 14-year old Darius Boone in the head.

At last report, he was in critical condition.

The same bullet traveled through Boone and into the leg of Christopher Hatch.

"Rounds travel, and they can do exactly what happened Sunday morning," said city police spokesperson Officer Michael Joyner.

Police tell us Hatch has been released from the hospital.

Officer Joyner says it's not a big surprise that something like this went down.

"Kids are kids, they're going to be curious and as much as we see firearms introduced through movies, through games, there's this attraction to them," Joyner said.

A lot of people swear by firearms as a means of protection around the home.

But without proper care, they can easily be twisted into something that can cause so much damage.

Long-time Fort Wayne police chief Rusty York, now a lecturer in the Department of Public Policy at IPFW, says for adults who own weapons, there are no excuses for those weapons to not be kept out of the reach of children.

"Anymore, as far as a gun vault, handgun safe, they're very inexpensive, you can get one for $20 on up, with either digital keypads, or even now biometric locking system...systems where you can just use your fingerprint," York said.

It's estimated nearly 1.7 million kids in America 18 and under are living in households with loaded and unlocked firearms.